Mar
31

Sustainatopia Conference

Robert Henrikson presented “Are Algae Microfarms the Future of Urban Farming?”

at Sustainatopia, May 2-4 in San Francisco CA.

 

Sustainatopia

 

The world of Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability (LOHAS), mission-based business, impact investing, social enterprise, and technology will gather this May at Sustainatopia, the premier green business conference. One of the largest conferences in the U.S. for social, financial and environmental sustainability + impact, Sustainatopia offers over 250 speakers from around the country.

This year’s conference offers six tracks:
• Ecosystem of Impact + SRI Investing
• Sustainable Strategies & Innovation (Fortune 500 Companies)
• Clean Technology & Smart Cities
• Empowering Women Through Investment – Health & Impact Tech
• Millennials 100
• Lifestyles of Health & Sustainability (LOHAS)

Jan
14

AIM International Readers Poll Winner

AIM Readers PollSmart Microfarms is the winner of Algae Industry Magazine 2015 International Readers Poll in the category “Algae Microfarm”.

The Algae Industry Magazine International Readers’ Poll mission is to 1. Recognize and reward innovation and excellence, 2. Convey who and what make a difference, 3. Celebrate innovative people, companies, technology.

AIM Algae Microfarm

 
Smart Microfarms– Richmond, California-based Smart Microfarms may be the future of greenhouse, hydroponic and urban farming. Microfarms offer scalable microalgae growing systems for school, urban, rooftop and vertical farms to grow high value food that is local, sustainable and profitable. Now in a small area, fast-growing microalgae, like spirulina, can produce higher income for growers than conventional vegetables and herbs.

Successful small-scale algae cultivation is now practical. Web-based remote sensors and controls developed by Robert Henrikson, CEO of Smart Microfarms, provide the expertise that guides local operators without the cost of onsite algae scientists. Scalable, modular growing systems allow microfarms to be installed anywhere. In this decade, 120 spirulina microfarmers have blossomed in France, demonstrating a new business model for how small growers innovate and build local and regional markets. For nearly 40 years Robert Henrikson has been an algae entrepreneur, a pioneer in spirulina production and marketing.


Readers PollAlgae Industry Magazine Readers’s Poll Winner in these categories:

Algae Ambassador – Robert Henrikson
Improved Planet Contributions – International Algae Competition
Algae Microfarm – Smart Microfarms
Algae Food, Feed, Nutirents – Smart Microfarms
Algae Cultivation Facility – Earthrise Nutritionals


Nov
01

Help Reset the Algae Industry

November 1, 2015 — by Robert Henrikson
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

AIM Lets Reset

Yes, push that red reset button to get the algae industry back on track, by nominating players who are making a real and positive contribution in the world of algae.

Over this past decade, the Algae Industry has been dominated by big money chasing the mirage of commercial algae biofuels. My March 2011 post “Shakeout in Algae Biofuels” described shakeout scenarios about to unfold.

This great biofuel boom and bust raked in billions of dollars in government, corporate and private investment over the past decade, attracting charlatans and collaborators (some who knew better) who sucked up the public bandwidth about algae, burned investors, and discouraged many from funding algae ventures for food, feed and high-value products.

Failed biofuel companies may try to excuse themselves because the price of oil fell. A decade ago, experts with real algae experience could not identify a pathway to make algae biofuel cost competitive with conventional fuel even at higher fuel prices. Where is the path forward today?

Just a few years ago corporate suits were dismissing non-fuel products from algae as “co-products” for “niche” markets. Now they are gone. Their replacements at algae biofuel ventures have desperately tried to pivot to those niche markets and algae co-products like food, feed, nutraceuticals, high value oils and fine chemicals, to show a real income stream for their sponsors.

During this time, we have also learned about the barriers to the massive scale required for biofuel commercialization. This undermines the claim that bigger is better, and renews appreciation of small is beautiful.

Algae industry conferences use to open with a plenary panel of algae CEO “all-stars,” touting their big successes developing biofuels. One-by-one they have dropped away. The largest algae industry organization in the USA engaged in ongoing efforts lobbying for government grants, subsidies and entitlements to maintain the faltering algae biofuel R&D industry.

If 10% of the funding for algae biofuels had been directed into R&D for animal nutrition studies and cost reduction for algae aquaculture and animal feeds and human food, we would already be well along on this path. Growing algae for feed and food will have a far greater impact on reducing negative effects of climate change than biofuels ever would, and in doing so, we will support all sentient beings on this Earth.

Let’s reset our algae narrative. There is plenty of good news to share. Opportunities abound. Refocus on the real algae industry that offers real products and services from algae. Let’s nominate individuals and organizations that understand how to change the world. “Eat Algae, Don’t Burn It.”

May
14

Are algae the greenhouse crop of the future?

http://www.hortidaily.com/article/17467/Are-algae-the-fresh-and-locally-grown-greenhouse-crop-of-the-future?

Algae have the potential to become a cash crop that can provide commercial greenhouse and controlled environment growers with a stable income stream, year round. According to Robert Henrikson, a pioneer in large scale commercial algae production, Spirulina algae is a crop that commercial growers could consider adding to their greenhouse or vertical farm. “I believe greenhouse growers will be the next to incorporate algae microfarms, seeking to diversify into new products with greater income potential.”
Robert Henrikson
Henrikson’s company Smart Microfarms is currently negotiating production and marketing joint-ventures with commercial greenhouse companies in California to set up spirulina microfarms and deliver spirulina farm-to-table, direct to consumer, and direct to retail. According to Henrikson, Spirulina farming can offer a higher income stream per greenhouse area, good ROI and payback of initial investment within 2-3 years. He explains that Algae can be a great additional crop for vertical farming as well in order to create a better business model.

“Vertical farming is a good initiative, it is sexy, looks exiting and supplies locally grown product direct to the market. Yet, it is a costly way of growing and may not always create the revenues to cover the cost of going vertical. Adding a spirulina cultivation inside a small portion of an existing urban farm or commercial greenhouse farm can change this and add higher income to become more successful.

Spirulina is a high-value food supplement, sold in health food stores for over 30 years, as dried powder, in tablets and capsules. Containing the unique phycocyanin (‘algae-blue’) known for strengthening the immune system, beneficial flora and healing response, and for detoxification, anti-oxidant and anti-ageing properties.
Now with local cultivation, spirulina can be enjoyed in a new way- fresh or fresh frozen –beautiful dark blue-green with almost no taste at all. Customers can melt and blend frozen cubes into juices for green drinks and mix fresh spirulina into dishes and recipes like dips, spreads and hummus. Or sprinkle tasty low-temperature dried spirulina on salads and soups.
Spirulina can be grown successfully in ponds by recreating its natural environment of high pH, alkaline and saline water. Spirulina can also be harvested and used as a supplement for growing fish and aquatic organisms within an integrated aquaponics system.
Spirulina Microfarm
Spirulina ponds in a greenhouse in Olympia, Washington State USA. Spirulina pond systems can fit within larger commercial greenhouses with greens, vegetables, herbs and aquaponic systems.

Currently Smart Microfarms is focused developing business opportunities in the U.S and Canada. However, Henrikson believes this business model is applicable almost anywhere in the world. He hopes to bring microalgae farming to greenhouse and controlled environment growers . “We can design and install practical, affordable and scalable spirulina microfarm turnkey systems, including ponds, circulation, harvesting, processing, freezing and dehydration, products, laboratory. Variations of these microfarms have been deployed and tested. With greenhouse infrastructure in place, growers could be in operation within 6 weeks.”

Smart Dashboard
Data and visual displays on a Smart Microfarms monitoring control panel, so remote experts can guide local operators.

Henrikson’s company can also offer innovative web-based remote sensing and monitoring systems to provide ongoing assistance to local operations for successful algae cultivation. “Small operations cannot afford an on-site experienced algae scientist to maintain successful and continuous algae cultures. Real-time web based reporting allows remote experts to guide local operators, reducing culture crashes and downtime. This system has been tested for the past two years in several locations and we are extending its capabilities.”

Green Drinks
Fresh harvest and fresh frozen spirulina blended in fresh green superfood juice drinks.
Product Line
Packaged fresh frozen and low temperature dried spirulina products.

But Smart Microfarms can also help to distribute ‘locally grown’ algae food and supplement products to the local and regional market. “With years of experience developing products, sales and marketing, including connections within the natural foods industry, we can provide an umbrella brand for aggregating the production of small local producers of quality spirulina. We bring to market branded and packaged nutraceuticals and food products sold direct to consumers, online, direct to natural food retail outlets, juice bars and restaurants. Smart Microfarms will source product from its own algae microfarms, other quality algae farms with unique products, and facilitate and develop new farms in its network with technical and marketing expertise, ensuring superior product quality.”

For more information: • Robert Henrikson • roberthe@sonic.net • www.smartmicrofarms.com


Feb
26

The Future of Urban Farming?

Are Algae Microfarms the Future of Urban Farming?

Growing local food in community gardens and urban farms is a popular and growing trend. Because urban space is limited and valuable, some entrepreneurs are transforming old warehouses and even underground spaces into indoor farms using artificial lighting. Others propose vertical farms, even growing food in skyscrapers.

But some scientists calculate that indoor urban farming results in food production with a high cost, high energy use and a big carbon footprint, regardless of whether energy comes from the conventional grid or renewables. They caution indoor food grown with artificial lighting may be less sustainable and more damaging to the environment than food transported from 3000 miles away.

Greenhouses growing food in empty lots or nearby urban areas would be a more cost effective solution. Urban greenhouses would extend the growing season, use existing urban infrastructure, enjoy close access to local markets and customers, and harness the best source of energy – the sun.

Rooftop Gardens
Will algae microfarms grow new superfoods for urban and rooftop farms around the world?

What’s coming now is the opportunity to grow high value microalgae to diversify greenhouse food production and significantly enhance revenues.

Over the past 30 years the microalgae spirulina has gained global recognition as a superfood supplement. This productivity breakthrough grows over 20 times more protein than any other conventional food crop on the same area, yet its therapeutic benefits are even more remarkable. Published international research shows how small amounts daily boost immune function, enhance detoxification, restore beneficial intestinal flora, improve neurological function and rally the body’s own healing response. Spirulina commands premium retail prices, $80/lb for dry product in the USA, €150/kg in France. Where fresh frozen product is available locally, even higher prices.

Most people think of large algae farms located in hot sunny desert or tropical locations. But in this past decade, over 110 algae greenhouse microfarms have spread across France. In the USA, spirulina is being successfully grown in greenhouse microfarms in the northern climate of the Pacific Northwest.

Olympia Farm 4

< Algae growing ponds have retractable and removable greenhouse covers. In cooler seasons, ponds are covered at night to retain warmth. In summertime, covers are completely removed.

These new algae microfarms are modular and scalable greenhouse systems with smart monitoring systems and web cameras so remote experts can successfully guide local operations at many locations simultaneously. With insulated ponds and efficient LED lighting and heating systems, the algae growing season can be extended in northern climates well beyond the typical short 4 or 5 months.

Olympia Greenhouse

< The first Pacific Northwest spirulina microfarm near Olympia Washington. This eco-region has a temperate rainforest climate with warm sunny summers and wet cloudy cool winters.

Smart Microfarms’ CEO Robert Henrikson founded one of the world’s first and largest algae farms, Earthrise Spirulina in Southern California, 35 years ago. He explains his own evolution from large to small farms. “For decades, algae have been grown on large commercial farms with extensive technical staffing and infrastructure. Now the time has come to introduce algae microfarms to grow healthy foods in local communities. Profitable business models already exist.”

The Pacific Northwest algae microfarm testbed will develop metrics for microfarm operations and productivity especially for temperate climates. They will test practical, affordable and replicable systems for growing algae for local food and high value products in community, urban, rooftop, mobile and vertical gardens to demonstrate how microfarms can transform small food growing area into generating more income.

Smart Microfarms can help terrestrial, hydroponic and aquaponic greenhouse farms diversify income stream with high-value algae food products.


Algae Microfarms

“Algae Microfarms”, the new book by Henrikson, available at Amazon.com, features individuals and organizations around the world growing algae on a small scale and making a difference today.

Some of these small farms are humanitarian, some are commercial, some are both. The book is a look into our future of scalable microalgae systems for home and community gardens, urban and rooftop farms and even living buildings.


Spirulina Algae Microfarm near Olympia Washington.
The first Pacific Northwest spirulina microfarm is located near Olympia Washington, a temperate rainforest eco-region with warm sunny summers and wet cloudy winters. Algae are harvested through a micro screen several times a week during the growing season. This smart microfarm testbed will show how algae microfarms generate income from a small area.
2:00 minute video of Spirulina Algae Microfarm near Olympia Washington (2013).


Oct
14

Microfarms for Rooftop and Urban Farms

Algae farms are often located in hot sunny desert or tropical locations, but new spirulina algae microfarms in the Pacific Northwest are testing features for growing algae in more northern temperate climates.

Olympia Farm 4

< Algae growing ponds have retractable and removable greenhouse covers. In cooler seasons, ponds are covered at night to retain warmth. In summertime, covers are completely removed.

Growing local vegetables in gardens and rooftop farms in urban areas around the world is a popular trend. Many urban farms use greenhouses with hydroponic and aquaponic systems to extend the natural growing season. Now high value microalgae, like spirulina, can diversify greenhouse food production and enhance revenues.

 

Rooftop Gardens
Will algae microfarms become new food crops for rooftop farms in cities around the world?

Over 30 years spirulina algae has gained global recognition as a superfood supplement. Published international research shows how consuming small amounts boost immune function, enhance detoxification, restore beneficial intestinal flora, improve neurological function and rally the body’s own healing response. For these reasons spirulina commands premium prices.

Olympia Greenhouse

< The first Pacific Northwest spirulina microfarm near Olympia Washington. This eco-region has a temperate rainforest climate with warm sunny summers and wet cloudy cool winters.

These new algae microfarms are modular and scalable greenhouse systems with smart monitoring systems and web cameras so remote experts can successfully guide local operations at many locations simultaneously. With insulated ponds and efficient LED lighting and heating systems, the algae growing season can be extended in northern climates well beyond the typical short 4 or 5 months.

Smart Microfarms’ CEO Robert Henrikson founded one of the world’s first and largest algae farms, Earthrise Spirulina in Southern California, 35 years ago. He explains his own evolution from large to small farms. “For decades, algae have been grown on large commercial farms with extensive technical staffing and infrastructure. Now the time has come to introduce algae microfarms to grow healthy foods in local communities. Algae microfarms are simplified and affordable systems with lower cost of entry, and can be enhanced by automation and web-based monitoring systems to reduce the need for experts on site. Profitable business models already exist.”

The Pacific Northwest algae microfarm testbeds will develop metrics for microfarm operations and productivity especially for temperate climates. They will test practical, affordable and replicable systems for growing algae for local food and high value products in community, urban, rooftop, mobile and vertical gardens to demonstrate how microfarms can transform any small food growing area into higher income generating food products.

Smart Microfarms can help terrestrial, hydroponic and aquaponic greenhouse farms diversify income stream with high-value algae food products.


Mar
11

Spirulina Benefits Against Radiation

Benefits of spirulina for protection against radiation effects
Robert Henrikson

The 2011 earthquake and tsunami accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan and the continuing radiation releases have raised concerns about radiation exposure. Many people have heard of reports about the beneficial effects of spirulina blue-green algae in protection against radiation and its related health problems.

These reports are published studies from Belarus in the 1990s using spirulina. The benefits for the Children of Chernobyl affected by radiation collaborated previous research, suggesting that spirulina provided beneficial effects against radiation and may be used to supplement other means of radiation protection.

Scientists theorize spirulina can bind heavy metals like mercury, lead, cadmium and radioactive isotopes and can accelerate excretion of these elements from the body.

Summary of three main benefits of spirulina against radiation

1. Belarus studies on humans affected by Chernobyl radiation. Five grams of Spirulina a day given to children caused reduction of Cesium-137 in urine by 50%. Spirulina decreased radiation dose load received from food contamination with radionuclides. (Belookaya 1991) (Loseva 1993) (Evets 1994). A Russian patent was awarded for the use of spirulina as a medical food to reduce allergic reactions from radiation sickness.

2. Chinese studies on radiation. Previous research demonstrated a natural polysaccharide extract of spirulina had a protective effect against gamma radiation in mice (Qishen 1989). Following research showed phycocyanin and polysaccharides from spirulina enhanced reproduction of bone marrow and cellular immunity (Zhang 1994).

3. International studies on benefits of spirulina against radiation effects. Three long-term effects of radiation are weakened immune system, oxidative stress and cancer. Numerous international studies have shown how spirulina stimulates the immune system and has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer benefits (spirulinasource.com).

Spirulina and the Children of Chernobyl
From the book Spirulina World Food, by Robert Henrikson

Years after the Chernobyl disaster, four million people in Ukraine and Belarus continued to live in dangerously radioactive areas. The water, soil and food over an 11,000 square mile area were contaminated. Over 160,000 children were victims of radiation poisoning, with birth defects, leukemia, cancer, thyroid disease, anemia, loss of vision and appetite and depressed immune system, called “Chernobyl AIDS.”

Based on promising international research that indicated spirulina may be beneficial against effects of radiation, while I was President of Earthrise Company, Earthrise donated spirulina to Children of Chernobyl Hospitals in Belarus and Ukraine in 1989.

Doctors reported spirulina’s health benefits for child victims of Chernobyl radiation. Spirulina reduced urine radioactivity levels by 50% in only 20 days. This result was achieved by giving 5 grams a day to children at the Minsk, Belarus Institute of Radiation Medicine. The Institute program treated 100 children every 20 days.

Based on testing in 1990, the Belarus Ministry of Health concluded spirulina promotes the evacuation of radionucleides from the human body. No side effects were registered. The Ministry considered this food was advisable for the treatment of people subject to radiation effects, and requested additional donations from the Earthrise Company of California and Dainippon Ink & Chemicals of Japan (Sokolovskiy 1991).

Belarus

In a 1991 study of 49 kindergarten children aged 3 to 7 years old in Beryozova, spirulina was given to 49 children for 45 days. Doctors found T-cell suppressors and beneficial hormones rose, and in 83% of the children, radioactivity of the urine decreased (Belookaya 1991).

< Nurse and child radiation victim at a medical clinic in Belarus.

An unpublished 1993 report confirmed 1990-91 research, concluding “spirulina decreases radiation dose load received from food contaminated with radionucleides, Cesium-137 and Strontium-90. It is favorable for normalizing the adaptive potential of children’s bodies in conditions of long-lived low dose radiation.” (Loseva 1993).

A Russian patent was awarded in 1994 for the use of spirulina as a medical food to reduce allergic reactions from radiation sickness. The patent was based on a study of 270 children living in highly radioactive areas. They had chronic radiation sickness and elevated levels of Immunoglobulin (IgE), a marker for high allergy sensitivity. Thirty five were prescribed 20 tablets per day (about 5 grams) for 45 days. Consuming spirulina lowered the levels of IgE in the blood, which in turn, normalized allergic sensitivities in the body (Evets 1994).

Research continuing through 1999 in Belarus showed immune building, normalization of peroxide lipid oxidation and detoxifying effects of spirulina supplements in children and teenagers. Scientists theorized spirulina may form non-absorbable complexes of radionucleides through analogues such as calcium or potassium and pro¬motes their excretion (Loseva 1999).

Ukraine

The author Robert Henrikson visited Chernobyl hospital clinics in Kiev Ukraine in 1995 to meet with the doctors and children going through radiation therapy.


References from Spirulina World Food (Amazon.com):
• Loseva, L.P. and Dardynskaya, I.V. Spirulina- natural sorbent of radionucleides. Research Institute of Radiation Medicine, Minsk, Belarus. Presented at the 6th Intl Congress of Applied Algology, Czech Republic, Sep. 9, 1993.
• Sokolovskiy, V. Corres. from the First Sec. BSSR to the United Nations, May 20, 1991.
• Belookaya, T. Correspondence from the Chairman of Byelorussian Committee “Children of Chernobyl” May 31, 1991.
• Qishen, P. et. al. Radioprotective effect of extract from spirulina platensis in mouse bone marrow cells studied by using the micronucleus test. Toxicology letters. 1989. 48:165-169.
• Zhang Cheng-Wu, et. al. Effects of polysaccharide and phycocyanin from spirulina on peripheral blood and hematopoietic system of bone marrow in mice. Second Asia Pacific Conf. Ibid, April, 1994.
• Evets, P. et. al. Means to normalize the levels of immunoglobulin E, using the food supplement spirulina. Grodenski State Medical Univ. Russian Federation Commitee of Patents and Trade. Patent (19)RU (11)2005486. Jan. 15, 1994.
• Loseva, L. P. Spirulina platensis and specialties to support detoxifying pollutants and to strengthen the immune system. Research Inst. of Radiation Medicine, Minsk, Belarus. presented at 8th Int’l Congress Applied Algology, Italy. Sep. 1999.

Spirulina World Food | SpirulinaSource.com

For a complete health library with 40 years of published international scientific research by health category go to www.spirulinasource.com/health-library.

ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY • ANTI-CANCER STUDIES • BETA CAROTENE AND CANCER PREVENTION • CHOLESTEROL REDUCTION • DIABETES AND HYPERTENSION REDUCTION • GLYCOLIPIDS AND SULFOLIPIDS • HEMATOPOIESIS AND IMMUNOMODULATION • IRON AND PREVENTION OF ANEMIA • KIDNEY AND LIVER DETOXIFICATION • LACTOBACILLUS IMPROVEMENT • MALNUTRITION RECOVERY • PHYCOCYANIN AND IMMUNE SYSTEM • POLYSACCHARIDES AND IMMUNE SYSTEM • RADIATION PROTECTIVE EFFECT AND IMMUNE SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT


Jul
05

Imagine Our Algae Future

How will growing algae change the world and improve our lives?

July 5, 2012: Imagine our future living in cities where buildings are covered with photosynthetic skins and vertical gardens, collecting the sun’s energy and producing food and energy for urban citizens. Imagine greening desert coastlines and producing food for millions of people. Imagine algae systems that recycle polluting wastes into high value animal food, fuel and biofertilizers.

ImagineCoverF

This book reviews algae production, products and potential today and showcases some of the amazing visions of our future from the International Algae Competition. Our future with algae offers rich and diverse opportunities that will impact every aspect of our lives.

International Algae Competition is a global challenge to design our future with algae food and energy systems.

As a participatory design game, Algae Competition invited global citizens from around the world to design their own future with the foods they eat, systems that grow algae, and landscapes and cityscapes they dream of living in. 140 participants responded, representing 40 countries, and they submitted some amazing designs, projects and food ideas.

ImagineCoverB

Imagine Our Algae Future chapters
1. Introduction
2. Algae Production, Products & Potential Today
3. International Algae Competition Awards
Exhibits from the International Algae Competition
4. Algae Production Systems
5. Visionary Architecture and Landscape Designs
6. Algae Food Development and Recipes
7. References and Author Biographies

By Robert Henrikson and Mark Edwards
Available at Amazon.com
164 pages, full color • 8″x10″ • ISBN 1475128185 • $29.95


About The Authors

Robert Henrikson has 35 years experience in sustainable development of natural resources such as algae, bamboo and forest carbon. Robert began algae production in 1977 and was founder and director of Earthrise Farms, which became the world’s largest spirulina algae farm in the 1990s. For 20 years Robert, was President of Earthrise Company, pioneer in algae, developing Earthrise® brand products in the USA and 30 countries. During that period he traveled the world promoting the health and environmental benefits of algae through hundreds of articles, publications, interviews and presentations. He authored Earth Food Spirulina in 1989, translated into 6 international editions, updated in 2010 as Spirulina World Food. Robert founded Algae Alliance in 2009, and is a consultant to companies and investors in algae ventures, and in 2010, founded the International Algae Competition, attracting 140 remarkable entries from 40 countries. Created the 2007 International Bamboo Building Design Competition, with registrants from 64 countries, and published the book Bamboo Architecture based on the competition.

Mark Edwards, PhD, served for 22 years as CEO of TEAMS International, the advanced assessment, software and technology firm he founded. Mark served as lead consultant for over 600 organizations globally in advanced metrics, leadership assessment and development, and new product development. The Financial Times named Mark one of the top 50 CEO coaches. TEAMS won the Inc. 500 Award and then sold to an international consultancy in 1998. Mark has taught strategic marketing, leadership, sustainability, and entrepreneurship at Arizona State University since 1978. Mark advises food, energy, and technology companies on strategy, structure, and technology. Mark has published over 100 articles and 18 books that span business and science disciplines. Green Algae Strategy won the 2009 Independent Publisher Gold Medal for best science book. Abundance: Sustainable fossil-free Foods win the 2011 Gold Medal for best book on the environment. Several of Mark’s nine books in the Green Algae Strategy series are used in colleges and universities in over 26 countries.

International Algae Competition objectives are to create an open source collaboratory that expands and shares a vision for algae in our future with design ideas for algae production landscapes, sustainable and affordable algae production systems (APS) for food, feed, energy, nutrients, water remediation, carbon capture and fine medicines, and new algae foods.

Mar
14

Shakeout in Algae Biofuels

An exciting time for algae business development
by Robert Henrikson • March 14, 2011
Download this article as a 2 page pdf file.

This year, Rand Corporation positions the algae biofuel industry as a research topic, calling into question the viability of renewable biofuels made from algae. Royal Dutch Shell Oil exits from its algae biofuel venture as Monsanto enters the algae industry. Is this the beginning of the shakeout?

Algae ventures have successfully raised millions for research and development for algae biofuels based on early promises. But will they be able to deliver algae biofuels that are cost competitive with conventional fuels within this decade? So far algae biofuels have been an engaging and expensive R&D project. The challenge of scaling up to demonstration projects begins now. Funding required for scale up is huge, and the lack of access to funding will amplify this shakeout.


Watch these scenarios unfold in the shakeout as the algae industry moves toward more realistic, sustainable business models.
• Those ventures with access to deep financial backing from big oil or government funds, and with technology that works, will be prepared to stay the course and produce biofuel products.
• Some high profile ventures are already pivoting their business models to develop more valuable and more immediate ‘co-products’ from algae. Two years ago, many ventures had dismissed co-product markets for algae food and feed products as ‘niche’ markets.
• Other ventures who realize they can’t make it all the way to biofuel commercialization will license or sell off assets such as algae research, cultivation knowhow, intellectual property, technology or system design or components.
• Some big venture partners will bail. The executive decision will be: “had a good look, got some good green press, but now we are cutting our losses and moving on to more immediately profitable opportunities.”
• Other ventures will continue with smoke and mirrors, touting their secret sauce, proprietary IP or GMO breakthrough to keep grabbing R&D funds or government grants. They operate on the hope that they can sell out to bigger fish before the world perceives they have no clothes.
• More ventures will shut down. Surviving ventures will pick off infrastructure, technology and personnel, like carrion birds feasting on a carcass.


Big investments in algae biofuels are bringing big benefits. Breakthroughs in identifying and adapting algae and innovating new technology and systems will lower algae production costs and open new markets for higher value algae food and feed products.

The scramble intensifies for algae ventures to show how their business model can actually produce algae at a reasonable cost for markets that are real and immediate. Smart algae biofuel companies are redirecting finite financial resources toward more immediate income streams from algae products to survive in the shakeout.

Large corporate players are now realizing the huge potential market for algae food, feed and nutraceuticals. Much investment will be directed towards algae, such as spirulina, that can already be successfully cultivated at lower cost.
We are entering a very exciting time for algae business development.


Oct
27

New Algae Products

AlgaeFood3

How big investments in the ‘biofuel of the future’
will grow our future food and its own bio-packaging from algae.

by Robert Henrikson • October 27, 2009

Download this article as a 4 page pdf file.


CloseEyes3 Today, algae is called the ‘biofuel of the future.’
30 years ago, it was called the ‘food of the future’.

Three decades ago, the first algae entrepreneurs were building growing ponds in countries like Mexico, India, Israel, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and the USA.
The first algae food supplements were introduced in the US natural food market in 1979. Growing food with 20 times the productivity as conventional crops, algae promised to become the ‘food of the future’. The dominant technology for commercial algae production for food and supplements has been open ponds in warm, sunny climates. Over time, some specialty algae products have been cultivated in closed or fermentation systems.

But production costs have remained high due to these factors: using agricultural land, fresh water, clean nutrients, skilled personnel, servicing big investments for pond systems, harvesting and drying infrastructure, and complying with food and quality regulations.


EFCyan4
With production costs over $10 per kilo, growing algae is ten times the cost of many commercial foods and feeds. Annual world microalgae output may have reached 10,000 tons of spirulina, chlorella, dunaliella and hematoccocus.

Even big commercial algae farms are relatively small, less than 100 hectares in size. Nevertheless, over the years, the number and variety of high value food and specialty products from algae has flourished.


Most people have no idea how many everyday products contain algae.
Algae is an ingredient in thousands of products for food, feed, colors, nutraceuticals, medicinals, cosmetics and personal care, biofertilizers and fine chemicals. Even more innovative algae based products are coming.
AlgaeToday9

The drive for cheap biofuel will make algae the food of the future. To become the “food of the future”, and compete with conventional human foods and animal feeds, algae production costs must be ten times lower. Lower costs will deliver healthy algae omega 3 oils and protein food and feed products, rebalancing our diets. We’ll see algae based resins, biopolymers, bioplastics and a range of specialty chemicals replacing today’s fossil fuel chemical products.

The big algae energy investment underway may take a decade to reach commercial biofuels. Algae food and bio-plastic products are likely to arrive earlier, since fuel is one of the least valuable end products. To deliver competitive algae biofuel, companies will need to crush costs to $1/kg or less!


How will algae production costs come down? Biomimicry.
Numerous ventures have now successfully raised a combined billion dollars for algae biofuel R&D and production. Innovations and technological breakthroughs will dramatically change the way algae has been produced over the past 30 years. How?
Discover better performing algae cultures. Thirty years ago, scientists used available natural strains such as spirulina and chlorella. Today, backed by R&D budgets, scientists screen, identify and engineer strains of algae with superior and enhanced properties, faster growth rates, and abilities to grow in conditions such as low light and temperature and high saline, brackish or ocean water.
Develop simpler, less costly design and technology. Rethink, redesign and reengineer the entire growing system, harvesting, processing and drying sequence to reduce capital costs for equipment, operating costs and power consumption.
Use marginal land and water just like nature. To grow algae on the large scale needed to produce biofuels, growers should not use valuable fertile agricultural land and scarce fresh water. Rather, find remnant flat land and ocean, saline, brackish or waste water near nutrient resources.
Use waste nutrients just like nature. To lower costs, future algae growing systems will have to follow principals of biomimicry. Recycle waste CO2 effluent, animal and plant wastes, which are costly problems today. Ferment agricultural, animal, industrial and waste streams into carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and trace nutrients to feed the algae. Or grow algae by cleaning up municipal waste.
Use all the algae biomass just like nature. Sell all of the algae. Start with the end product and work backwards. What are the products that can be sold, and for how much, and how will markets be developed for those products?
Create multiple revenue streams to offset costs. Environmental services may include CO2 and pollution mitigation, wastewater treatment, biomass and waste heat for generating electricity and even carbon offsets. Non-fuel algae products may represent the 70% of the algae biomass. Potential revenue streams include algae oil and lipid supplementation in animal and human feed, like healthy omega 3 oils, animal feedstocks and supplements, biofertilizers, fine chemicals and bio-plastics, extracts for pigments nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals and medicinals..
Get big. Scale up to thousands of hectares. Large algae farms will enjoy economies of scale. Along the way, demonstration farms to prove out technologies will generate revenue streams from non-fuel products for smaller markets.
Exploit the unexpected – carpe diem. Investment drives innovation, creates serendipity and breakthroughs. Who knows what will unfold that we haven’t thought of yet.
So get use to life from the base of the food chain.
The dazzling array of eco-products coming from algae will be healthy for you and our planet.